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The ghosts of Castle Huntly,how haunted is it really?


Castle Huntly, has its share of tales to tell,some of which have become so distorted through time.None the less ,the legends are still today being told.

Castle Huntly

http://www.darkdundee.co.uk/myths-legends/the-ghosts-of-castle-huntly/

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/kenneill/huntly/myths_legends.htm

Tradition would have it that Lord Grey named the castle after his wife, a daughter of the Earl of Huntly, but since the lineage can be traced back to Browfield or the estates at Broxmouth on the east coast not far from Dunbar, it is more likely that the name was taken from the village of Huntly in the parish of Gordon, which formed part of the Broxmouth estate. Another theory is that before the castle was built there was a field known as Huntly, and a burn which ran through the lands was of the same name.

Back before Castle Huntly became a prison, it had a history all of its own – and a couple of its own ghosts, to boot. There are two ghosts alleged to still haunt Castle Huntly; the White Lady and that of a young boy. When researching the ghosts of Castle Huntly, it became apparent that there is some confusion between Castle Huntly and Huntly Castle (which is in Aberdeenshire), and, as such, the ghost stories of which White Lady belonged to which castle seems to get a little skewed.

We’re going to stick with the story of the young woman being a daughter of the Lyon family, the Earls of Kinghorne (which was later changed to Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne). The title Earl of Kinghorne was actually created in 1606 for Patrick Lyon, and when Castle Huntly was acquired by the Earl in 1614, he had the name changed to Castle Lyon. It was not until the castle was sold in 1777 that the name was reverted back to Castle Huntly.

Whether the woman in the story was the first Earl of Kinghorne’s daughter or granddaughter, we do not know, but, from what we have read, it appears as though she may have had an inappropriate relationship with one of the castle’s manservants. It wasn’t all too uncommon for sexual relationships to form between social classes, as privacy was hard to come by, and servants were often put in sexually vulnerable positions by their masters or mistresses, as well as by lodgers, guests and each other. Remember there wasn’t a lot to do back then!

When they were found out, the pair were separated. Whether the manservant was imprisoned, tortured, murdered, or all three, we cannot say for sure, but it’s pretty clear that, in those times, he wasn’t just going to be sent on his way with his wages and his P45 in hand. Whoever he was, he very likely met a grisly end. The nameless Lyon daughter was locked in a chamber on the upper levels of the castle, and it was from the window of this room that she is said to have met her doom. Her body was found, broken and bleeding on the grounds directly under her bedroom window, with nothing that could be done to save her.

For many years there has been speculation about a tunnel between Castle Huntly and Glamis, a distance of about 15 miles. In 1939 press speculation revived this legend, when some old plans were found by Colonel A. G. Paterson on his rediscovering the dungeon. To date there has been no evidence to support this legend, and indeed even a modest understanding of the topography makes the practicalities of such an endeavour questionable. Another tale of the links between Glamis and Castle Huntly surrounds the first Earl of Strathmore. It was said that it was his intention to build an avenue of trees between the two castles despite the 15 mile distance.

tunnel

To add a twist to an already murky story, whilst some may say that she killed herself as a result of a broken heart or at being imprisoned in her own family home, others have whispered that she may not have taken her own life and may, in fact, have been pushed. There are a lot of facets to this story that don’t quite add up (which we tend to find with a lot of the older ghost stories), hence their origins as legends and not actual fact. What did happen to the manservant? And why can’t we name the Lyon daughter on who the tale is supposedly based? And the big question – did she fall, or was she pushed? We’ll just never know.

Moving away from the mysterious White Lady, the second ghost alleged to haunt Castle Huntly is that of a young boy, named the Paterson Ghost. He is believed to be the descendant of George Paterson – the man who purchased the castle from the Lyons in 1777 for £40,000, and also the man who gave Castle Huntly back its original name. Fast-forward 150 years or so, to when Colonel Adrian Paterson and his family occupied Castle Huntly.

Their only son, Richard, tragically died in a boating accident aboard the river Tay in 1939, and it is his ghost that is said to haunt the castle. He is said to be seen in the same room as the White Lady wearing a double-breasted sailing jacket. Interestingly, no-one seems to know what colour it is, which, given the “sightings”, you would think that someone would be able tell us at least if it was light or dark. Whilst the White Lady is alleged to haunt the grounds of the castle as well as the room, young Richard is said to appear only in the room once occupied by the fated daughter of Lyon.

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/kenneill/huntly/myths_legends.htm

http://www.darkdundee.co.uk/myths-legends/the-ghosts-of-castle-huntly/

About BEYOND THE EDGE OF REALITY

MY NAME IS EVAN JENSEN A PARANORMAL EXPERT IF THERE IS SUCH A THING. I myself being involved at various aspects of the paranormal have come to realize it is a field riddled with conmen and frauds hoping to evade the public and con as many as possible. This paper I.E blog site has stopped many from doing such. It is a free site for those needing help and wishing to spread the news of there fellow con people.

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